National Association of Local Authorities of Ghana (NALAG)

Regions

ASHANTI REGION
About Ashanti Region
Ashanti is an administrative region in Ghana centrally located in the middle belt of Ghana. It lies between longitudes 0.15W and 2.25W, and latitudes 5.50N and 7.46N. The region shares boundaries with four of the ten political regions, Brong-Ahafo in the north, Eastern region in the east, Central region in the south and Western region in the South west.

Most of the region's inhabitants are Ashanti people, one of Ghana's major ethnic groups. Most of Ghana's cocoa is grown in Ashanti, and it is also a major site of Ghana's gold-mining industry.
Brief history

The Asante (Ashantis) constitute the largest of the various subgroups of the Akan, who trace their origins partly to Bono-Manso and Techiman, in present-day Brong Ahafo Region. They constitute 14.8 per cent of all Ghanaians by birth, and 30.1 per cent of the total Akan population of 8,562,748 in the country. Various oral traditions have it that the Ashantis migrated from various places through Bono Manso/Takyiman (Techiman) to present day Ashanti Region.

Demographic characteristics
The population of the region is concentrated in a few districts. The Kumasi metropolis alone accounts for nearly one-third of the region's population. Slightly over half, 51.5 per cent, of the population of the region is in four districts. While more than half of the population in the region resides in urban areas, in 15 of the 18 districts, over half the population live in rural areas. The high level of urbanisation in the region is due mainly to the high concentration of the population in the Kumasi metropolis (which has almost about a third of the region’s population).

ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

The economically active population in the region is engaged mainly in Agriculture (excluding Fishing), with 44.5 per cent of them employed in the branch of activity. This represents a decline from the 1984 level of 61.9 percent. The next highest proportion of the economically active population is employed in Wholesale and Retail Trade (18.4%), followed by Manufacturing (12.2%) and Community, Social and Personal Services etc., (9.9%). These four major economic activities employ a total of 85.0 per cent of the economically active population, which is lower than that of 1984 (94.4%).

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION

There are 30 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Ashanti Region with Kumasi Metropolis as the regional capital).

It is consists of 1 Metropolitan, 8 Municipal and 21 District Assemblies.

The Regional Minister is the political Head of the region, and the Chairman of the Regional Co-ordinating Council. Other members of the Regional Co-ordinating Council include the Regional Co-ordinating Director (Secretary), all the 30 MMDAs Chief Executives and Presiding members, as well as two representatives from the Ashanti Regional House of Chiefs. All Regional heads of department are ex-officio members of the Regional Co-ordinating Council.

The MMDAs are headed by Metropolitan, Municipal/District Chief Executives (MMDCEs). The MMDCEs are nominated by the President of the Republic and approved by two-thirds majority of the respective MMDAs. The Chief Executives, like the Regional Minister, are assisted by District Co-ordinating Directors.



BRONG AHAFO
About Brong Ahafo
The Brong Ahafo Region was created on 4th April 1959 (by the Brong Ahafo Region Act No. 18 of 1959). The Act defined the area of the Brong Ahafo Region to consist of the northern and the western part of the then Ashanti Region and included the Prang and Yeji areas that before the enactment of the Act formed part of the Northern Region. Before the Ashanti Empire was conquered by the British in 1900, the Brong and Ahafo states to the north and northwest of Kumasi (the capital of Ashanti empire and the present Ashanti Region) were within the empire. Nana Akumfi Ameyaw III traces his ancestry to King Akumfi Ameyaw I (1328-63), under whose reign the Brong Kingdom with its capital at Bono Manso grew to become the most powerful kingdom of its time. Indeed oral tradition has it that nearly all the different groups of the Akans, including the Asante, trace their origins to Bono after migrating from the “north”.

Physical features
The Brong Ahafo Region, formerly a part of the Ashanti Region, was created in April 1959. It covers an area of 39,557 square kilometres and the second largest region in the country (16.6%) and shares boundaries with the Northern Region to the north, the Ashanti and Western Regions to the south, the Volta Region to the east, the Eastern Region to the southeast and La Cote d’Ivoire to the west. The central point of the landmass of Ghana is in the region, at Kintampo. The region lies in the forest zone and is a major cocoa and timber producing area. The northern part of the region lies in the savannah zone and is a major grain- and tuber-producing region. The region has a population of 1,815,408, indicating an intercensal growth rate of 2.5 per cent over the 1984 population figure. Enumeration covered all the 17,546 localities in the region.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION

There are 27 administrative
districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Brong
Ahafo with Sunyani as the regional capital.

It is consists of 7 Municipal and 20 District Assemblies.



CENTRAL REGION
The Central Region is one of Ghana's ten administrative regions. It is bordered by the Ashanti and Eastern regions to the north, Western region to the west, Greater Accra region to the east, and to the south by the Atlantic Ocean.

History and Geography
The Central Region was historically part of the Western Region until 1970 when it was carved out just before the 1970 Population Census. It occupies an area of 9,826 square kilometres or 4.1 per cent of Ghana’s land area, making it the third smallest in area after Greater Accra and Upper East. It shares common boundaries with Western Region on the west, Ashanti and Eastern Regions on the north, and Greater Accra Region on the east. On the south is the 168-kilometre length Atlantic Ocean (Gulf of Guinea) coastline.

The region was the first area in the country to make contact with the Europeans. Its capital, Cape Coast, was also the capital of the Gold Coast until 1877, when the capital was moved to Accra. It was in the castle of Cape Coast that the historic Bond of 1844 was signed between the British and the Fante Confederation.

Political and Administrative Structure

There are 20 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Central Region with Cape Coast as the regional capital.

It is consists of 1 Metropolitan, 7 Municipal and 12 District Assemblies.



EASTERN REGION
About Eastern Region
The Eastern Region occupies a land area of 19,323 kilometres and constitutes 8.1 per cent of the total land area of Ghana. It is the sixth largest region in terms of land area. It lies between latitudes 6o and 7o North and between longitudes 1o30’ West and 0o30’ East. The region shares common boundaries with the Greater Accra, Central, Ashanti, Brong Ahafo and Volta Regions.

The region has four main geographical features, namely:
o    The Kwahu scarp with an elevation of 2,586 feet above sea level.
o    The Atiwa-Atwaredu Ranges near Kibi, reaching an elevation of 2,400 feet.
o    The Akuapem highland attaining an elevation of 1,530 feet which is the southern extension of the Togo-Atakora mountain ranges and
o    The isolated hills/mountains dotting the relatively low-lying plains to the south, notably the Krobo and the Yogaga mountains.

The population of the region according to 2010 Population and Housing Census stands at 2,633,154 with 1,290,539 male and 1,342,615 female.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION

There are 26 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Ashanti Region with Kumasi Metropolis as the regional capital).

It is consists of 10 Municipal and 16 District Assemblies


GREATER ACCRA
About Greater Accra
The Greater Accra Region is the smallest of the 10 administrative regions in terms of area, occupying a total land surface of 3,245 square kilometres or 1.4 per cent of the total land area of Ghana. In terms of population, however, it is the second most populated region, after the Ashanti Region, with a population of 4,010,054 in 2010, accounting for 15.4 per cent of Ghana’s total population.

The Gas form the largest single sub-ethnic grouping of the region. The widely spoken language is Ga-Adangbe. The region however has people from all other regions of the country.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION

Greater Accra houses the seat of the President (Flagsatff House), Parliament and various Ministries.
There are 16 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Greater Accra with Accra doubling as the National and the Regional capital.

It is consists of 2 Metropolitan, 9 Municipal and 5 District Assemblies.
The Assemblies have wide-ranging social, economic and legislative jurisdiction over their respective local authority areas, but there is a Regional Coordinating Council (RCC) to coordinate and monitor the activities of these Assemblies. The Regional Coordinating Council, which is headed by the Regional Minister, has the following membership: the Regional Minister and his Deputies, the Presiding Member and the Chief Executive from each Assembly in the Region, two Chiefs from the Regional House of Chiefs, and regional heads of decentralized ministries, departments and agencies (MDAs) in the region as members without voting rights. The Regional Coordinating Director is the Secretary to the Regional Coordinating Council.

ECONOMY

Out of a population of 1,945,284 persons aged 15 years and older, 1,377,903 or 70.8 per cent are economically active. Among the economically active population, 82.6 per cent had worked, 4.0 per cent had jobs but did not work and 13.4 per cent are unemployed. The region’s unemployment rate (13.4%) is higher than the national figure of 10.4 percent.

The occupational structure of the region shows that 42.0 per cent of the economically active population were engaged in sales and service occupations, while professional, technical and related workers comprise 10.8 percent. The three largest occupational groups among males are production, transport operators and related workers (29.6%), sales workers (19.4%), and clerical and related workers (14.4%), compared with 42.0 per cent of females in sales occupation, 19.5 per cent in production, transport and equipment, and 13.9 per cent in service occupations. The industrial sector is dominated by wholesale and retail trade (30.4%) and manufacturing (16.7%). 



NORTHERN REGION

About Northern Region
The Northern Region, occupies an area of about 70,383 square kilometres, and is the largest region in Ghana in terms of land area. It shares boundaries with the Upper East and the Upper West Regions to the north, the Brong Ahafo and the Volta Regions to the south, and two neighbouring countries, the Republic of Togo to the east, and La Cote d’ Ivoire to the west.

The land is mostly low lying except in the north-eastern corner with the Gambaga escarpment and along the western corridor. The region is drained by the Black and white Volta and their tributaries, Rivers Nasia, Daka, etc.

Climate And Vegetation

The climate of the region is relatively dry, with a single rainy season that begins in May and ends in October. The amount of rainfall recorded annually varies between 750 mm and 1050 mm. The dry season starts in November and ends in March/April with maximum temperatures occurring towards the end of the dry season.

The population of the region according to 2010 Population and Housing Census stands at 2,479,461 with 1,229,887 male and 1,249,574 female.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION

The main administrative structure in the region is the Regional Coordinating Council (RCC), headed by the Regional Minister, who is also the Chairman of the Regional Security Council (REGSEC). Other members of the RCC include the Regional Coordinating Director, District Chief Executives and presiding members of the District Assemblies, and two representatives from the Regional House of Chiefs. All heads of decentralised departments are ex-officio members of the RCC. The Regional Coordinating Director is the Secretary to the Council.

There are 26 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Northern Region with Tamale Metropolis as the regional capital.

It is consists of 1 Metropolitan, 2 Municipal and 23 District Assemblies.

ECONOMY

The majority of people in the region are engaged in agriculture. The crops that they produce include yam, maize, millet, guinea corn, rice, groundnuts, beans, soya beans and cowpea. At Gushie in the Savelugu-Nanton District, there is a large plantation of grafted mangoes cultivated by outgrowers. Bontanga in the Tolon Kumbungu District has a big irrigation dam where farmers engage in large-scale rice cultivation during the dry season.


UPPER EAST

Background and Location
The Upper East Region of Ghana is located in the northeastern corner of the country between longitude 00 and 10 West and latitudes 100 30”N and 110N and bordered by Burkina Faso to the north and Togo to the east the west by Sissala in Upper West and the south by West Mamprusi in Northern Region. The capital is Bolgatanga, sometimes shortened to Bolga. Other cities include Bawku and Navrongo. In area, the Upper East Region is 8842 square kilometers.

The land is relatively flat with a few hills to the East and southeast. The total land area is about 8,842 sq km, which translates into 2.7 per cent of the total land area of the country.

Historically, the Upper East Region is part of what used to be the Upper Region (Upper East and Upper West), which was itself carved out of what used to be the Northern Region on 1st July, 1960.
The population of the region according to 2010 Population and Housing Census stands at 1,046,545 with 506,405 male and 540,140 female.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE

Political structure
At the time of the 2010 Census, the Region had the following administrative Districts and their capitals: Builsa (Sandema), Kassena-Nankana West (Paga), Kasena Nankana Eest (Navrongo), Bolgatanga Municipal (Bolgatanga), Talensi Nabdam (Tongo), Bongo (Bongo), Bawku West (Zebila), Garu Tempane (Garu) and Bawku Municipal (Bawku).

Since, and as a result of the 2010 Census, the following four new Districts have been created: Nabdam (carved out of Talensi-Nabdam) with its capital at Nangodi, Builsa South (carved out of Builsa) with its capital at Fumbisi, Binduri (carved out of Bawku East) with its capital at Binduri and Pusiga (carved out of Bawku East) with its capital at Pusiga.

Administrative Structure
The Region is administered politically from Bolgatanga. The main administrative structure at the Regional level is the Regional Co-ordinating Council (RCC), headed by the Regional Minister. Other members of the RCC include representatives from each District Assembly, Regional Heads of Decentralized Ministries, and representatives of the Regional House of Chiefs.

There are 13 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Upper East Region with Bolgatanga as the regional capital.

It is consists of 3 Municipal and 10 District Assemblies.

ECONOMY

The main occupations in the region in order of magnitude are, agriculture and related work (65.9%), production and transport equipment work (14.5%), sales work (9.5%) service work (3.9%), and professional, technical and related work 3.8 per cent. The five together make up 97.6 per cent of all occupations. The occupational structure of the region is thus not very diverse.

The substantial lack of formal sector, office based bureaucratic activities in the region is reflected in the fact that only 1.7 per cent of the economically active are engaged in administrative, managerial, clerical and related work. About two out of every three are in agriculture (66.4%).

The rank order of the five occupations is same for males and females. The proportion of females in sales work (13.3%) is twice that of males (5.8%). The proportion of males in agriculture is 71.8 per cent compared with 61.2 per cent females.


UPPER WEST


The region covers a geographical area of approximately 18,478 square kilometres. This constitutes about 12.7 per cent of the total land area of Ghana. The region is bordered on the North by the Republic of Burkina Faso, on the East by Upper East Region, on the South by Northern Region and on the West by Cote d’Ivoire.The region is located in the guinea savannah vegetation belt.

The vegetation consists of grass with scattered drought resistant trees such as the shea, the baobab, dawadawa, and neem trees. The heterogeneous collection of trees provides all domestic requirements for fuel wood and charcoal, construction of houses, cattle kraals and fencing of gardens. The shorter shrubs and grass provide fodder for livestock.

The population of the region according to 2010 Population and Housing Census stands at 702,110 with 341,182 male and 360,928 female.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE

Since its creation in 1983, the Upper West Region has had Wa as its capital and seat of government and administration. The Local Government Act of 1993 establishes and regulates the local government system in accordance with the 1992 Constitution. The Act stipulates the maintenance of districts in existence immediately before the coming into force of the 1992 Constitution.

There are 11 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Upper West Region with Wa as the regional capital.

It is consists of 1 Municipal and 10 District Assemblies.

ECONOMY

Economic Activity Status of Population 15 years and Older
Information was collected on the economic activity status of the population aged 15 years and older during the seven days preceding the census. These were classified as employed, unemployed or not economically active. Out of the population of 409,412 aged 15 years and older in the region, 67.3 percent were employed and 2.9 percent unemployed, while 29.8 percent were not economically active.

Employed Population 15 years and older
A little over 86.0 percent of employed persons 15 years and older across districts were resident in rural areas. In contrast, Wa Municipal hosted 65.3 percent of all employed persons residing in urban areas in the region.The proportion of employed females was slightly higher than the proportion of employed males in all districts except Wa East (36.3% females and 38.0% males). A large proportion (73.0%) of the economically not active population resided in rural areas. This was the case for all districts except Wa Municipal where 70.1 percent of the economically not active population were resident in urban areas. The proportion of the female population (16.9%) that was economically not active in the region was higher than that of males (13.6%) and this was true for all districts except Wa Municipal where a slightly higher proportion of males (22.8%) than females (22.4%) were economically not active.



VOLTA

Volta Region is one of the ten regions in Ghana. It lies on the eastern side of the country. The region derived its name from the Volta River, which virtually separates it from the rest of the country. The region is unique in the sense that it is the longest of the regions and has all the ecological zones and ethnic groups found in Ghana living in it as indigenes. For this uniqueness, the region is described as a microcosm of the country.

Historically, the northern part of the region, with the exception of the regional capital, Ho, was part of the German colony, while the southern part was administered as part of the Gold Coast colony. After Germany?s defeat in World War I, its colony of Togoland was partitioned. One portion was placed under the protectorate of Britain as the British Togo. The other, under French protectorate, became the French Togo, now the Republic of Togo.

The British protectorate of Togoland, later to be known as Trans-Volta Togoland (TVT), was administered by the Governor of the Gold Coast. After Ghana achieved independence in 1957, the Parliament adopted a resolution to merge and integrate the Trans-Volta Togoland with Ghana, under the name Volta Region.

The population of the region according to 2010 population and housing census stands at 2,118,252 with 1,019,398 male and 1,098,854 female.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE

As in the other regions in Ghana, the Volta Region has a decentralized political and administrative system. It is divided into 18 administrative Municipal/District Assemblies headed by Municipal/District Chief Executives. Each Municipal/District Assembly has responsibility for the overall development of the area under its jurisdiction. The Municipal/District Chief Executives are also responsible to the President through the Regional Minister who is the political head of the region. Administratively, the Municipal/District Assemblies are composed of zonal, urban, town and area councils.

The lowest level sub-structures are the unit committees. The apex of the decentralized administrative system is the Regional Coordinating Council (RCC) and the District Assembly. The RCC comprises the Regional Minister, his Deputy, representatives of the Regional House of Chiefs, the District Chief Executives of the region, Presiding Members, and representatives of the various decentralized ministries, departments and agencies (MDAs).

There are 25 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Volta Region with Ho as the regional capital.

It is consists of 5 Municipal and 20 District Assemblies.

ECONOMY

Information on the activity status of the population indicates that 69.9 percent of the population 15 years and older are economically active. The proportion of persons who are economically active is higher for females (52.9%) than males (47.1%). The general activity rate of 64.9% in the rural areas is much higher that of urban areas (35.1%). However, across districts, general activity rates in urban areas are higher than those in rural areas in Keta, Ketu Sout, Ho and Hohoe municipalities.

Of the economically active population, 67.0 percent are employed, 2.9 percent are unemployed, and 30.1 percent are not economically active. There are urban-rural differences in the proportion employed (61.0% urban against 73.1% rural). Of the 37,222 unemployed persons recorded in the region, 54.9 percent are females and 45.1 percent are males. Among the districts, the unemployment rate is highest in Jasikan (50.9%), followed by Kadjebi (48.7%) and by Nkwanta North (48.4%), while Keta Municipality recorded the lowest proportion (38.2%).

Most of the economically active population in the region are self-employed without employee(s) (72.5%), followed by those who are employees (11.2%), contributing family workers (9.8%) and self-employed with employee(s) (2.8%). People in apprenticeship, domestic work and others together constitute 2.3 percent of workers. The informal private sector is the largest employer in the region (90.6%), followed by public (government) sector (6.1%).



WESTERN REGION


Physical Features
The Western Region covers an area of 23,921 square kilometres, which is about 10 per cent of Ghana’s total land surface. It is located in the south-western part of Ghana, bordered by Ivory Coast on the West, Central Region on the East, Ashanti and Brong-Ahafo Regions on the North and on the South by 192 km of coastline of the Atlantic Ocean. The southern most part of Ghana, Cape Three Points, near Busua, is in the Ahanta West District of the region.

The population of the region according to 2010 Population and Housing Census stands at 2,376,021 with 1,187,774 male and 1,188,247 female.

POLITICAL ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE

The Western Region’s political and administrative power emanates from the Regional Coordinating Council (RCC). The Council is chaired by the Regional Minister with the Regional Coordinating Director serving as the secretary.

There are 22 administrative districts (Metropolitan, Municipal and Districts - MMDAs) in the Western Region with Secondi-Takoradi as the regional capital.

It is consists of 1 Metropolitan, 3 Municipal and 18 District Assemblies.

ECONOMY

Economic Activity Status by Districts
For the entire Region, seven out of ten persons are economically active, while one out of three are not. Juabeso has the highest economically active rate of 83.8 percent while Ellembelle recorded the lowest rate of 59.0 percent. Ten districts recorded rates of over 70 percent while five (Jomoro, Nzema East, Sekondi-Takoradi Metro, Shama, and Tarkwa Nsuaem) all have values of over 60 percent. Some of the low activity rates are also found in more urbanized districts in the Region.

The distribution of economic activity status by District and sex shows that in all districts the proportion of males who are economically active is slightly higher than the females, the only exceptions being Sekondi and Takoradi sub-metros, where the reverse is true.

The Region has 4.1 percent of persons aged 15 years and over unemployed. Four Districts, namely, Ahanta West, Sekondi Takoradi Metro, Shama and Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipal, recorded values higher than the Regional figure, with Sekondi-Takoradi Metro having reported the highest value of 7.0 percent. Sefwi Akontombra (1.4%) and Juabeso (1.1%) have the lowest proportions

In the northern Districts, the proportion of unemployed males is lower than that of females, while proportion of unemployed males is higher in the southern Districts. Tarkwa Nsuaem, Prestea-Huni Valley and Wassa Amenfi East are the only exceptions to this general pattern.